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File #: 2021-172    Version: 1 Name:
Type: Resolution Status: Passed
File created: 5/5/2021 In control: Board of Directors
On agenda: 5/26/2021 Final action: 5/26/2021
Title: Contract No. 2004666 Conner Creek Dike Improvements Vendor: M-K Construction Company, Inc. CIP: 260621, No Score under CIP CSO Program 260600
Sponsors: Navid Mehram
Indexes: Wastewater Operations
Attachments: 1. 2004666.Procurement Board Report-RFP, 2. 2004666.Cost Tabulation - Notice of Respondentsrev2 5.4.21

Title
Contract No. 2004666
Conner Creek Dike Improvements
Vendor: M-K Construction Company, Inc.
CIP: 260621, No Score under CIP CSO Program 260600

Body
Agenda of: May 26, 2021
Item No.: 2021-172
Amount: $1,871,247.00

TO: The Honorable
Board of Directors
Great Lakes Water Authority

FROM: Sue F. McCormick
Chief Executive Officer
Great Lakes Water Authority

DATE: April 30, 2021

RE: Contract No. 2004666
Conner Creek Dike Improvements
Vendor: M-K Construction Company, Inc.

MOTION
Upon recommendation of Navid Mehram, Chief Operating Officer - Wastewater Operating Services, the Board of Directors (Board) of the Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA), authorizes the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) to enter into Contract No. 2004666, "Conner Creek Dike Improvements" with M-K Construction Company, Inc., at a cost not to exceed $1,871,247.00 for a duration of 365 Calendar Days; and authorizes the CEO to take such other action as may be necessary to accomplish the intent of this vote.



BACKGROUND
The Conner Creek CSO Facility was constructed in the early 2000s. Adjacent to the CSO Facility is the Connor's Creek Canal which connects the CSO Facility to the Detroit River. On the other side of the Canal is Clairpointe Street. During construction of the facility, a "berm" was constructed between the canal and Clairpointe Street to separate the canal from the roadway, and primarily to act as a decorative feature for plants/landscaping. In July 2020, a discovery provided evidence that the berm was exhibiting signs of seepage through it, and therefore showing signs of failure. Given the berm's original use, it was primarily constructed of materials including large rocks, sand, and other pervious materials. As the Great Lakes levels increased and have sustained these high levels, the berm began acting as a "dike" which is there to permanently hold backwater, rather than for aesthetic appearance. The construction technology and material between a berm and dike ...

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