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File #: 2021-274    Version: 1 Name:
Type: Resolution Status: Passed
File created: 7/7/2021 In control: Board of Directors
On agenda: 7/28/2021 Final action: 7/28/2021
Title: Contract No. 2004549 Lake Huron Water Treatment Plant - Flocculation Improvements CIP# 111012 / BCE Score: 72.0
Sponsors: Cheryl Porter, Grant Gartrell
Indexes: Water Operations
Attachments: 1. 2004549 Procurement Report, 2. 2004549 Cost Tabulation
Title
Contract No. 2004549
Lake Huron Water Treatment Plant - Flocculation Improvements
CIP# 111012 / BCE Score: 72.0
Body
Agenda of: July 28, 2021
Item No.: 2021-274
Amount: $ 7,869,811.00

TO: The Honorable
Board of Directors
Great Lakes Water Authority

FROM: Sue F. McCormick
Chief Executive Officer
Great Lakes Water Authority

DATE: July 7, 2021

RE: Contract No. 2004549
Lake Huron Water Treatment Plant - Flocculation Improvements
Vendor: CDM Smith Michigan, Inc.


MOTION
Upon recommendation of Cheryl Porter, Chief Operating Officer - Water and Field Services, the Board of Directors (Board) of the Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA), authorizes the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) to enter into Contract No. 2004549 "Lake Huron Water Treatment Plant - Flocculation Improvements" with CDM Smith, Inc., at a cost not to exceed $7,869,811.00 for a duration of 2,300 days; and authorizes the CEO to take such other action as may be necessary to accomplish the intent of this vote.
BACKGROUND
GLWA's Lake Huron Water Treatment Plant (LHWTP) is located in Fort Gratiot, Michigan. The principle water treatment processes at the LHWTP involve rapid mix, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, and disinfection. The existing flocculation process at the LHWTP uses turbine-style mechanical flocculation technology. This technology has been used since the plant's original startup on September 11, 1974, and was replaced largely in kind about 20 years ago. The existing horizontal turbine flocculators have a demonstrated history of high-breakage rates, and significant maintenance and repair requirements. This is mainly due to the flocculator's 200-feet long shafts, which are unusually long for flocculation basins. Replacement parts for the existing flocculators carry high costs. For example, it would cost more than $2 million just to purchase shaft bearings, which are a high-wear item and break frequently. Moreover, an entire flocculation chamber has to be taken out o...

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